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The True Cost (2015) online

The True Cost (2015) online
Original Title :
The True Cost
Genre :
Movie / Documentary / Biography / Drama / News
Year :
2015
Directror :
Andrew Morgan
Cast :
Livia Giuggioli,Stella McCartney,Vandana Shiva
Writer :
Andrew Morgan
Type :
Movie
Time :
1h 32min
Rating :
7.7/10

The True Cost is a documentary film exploring the impact of fashion on people and the planet.

The True Cost (2015) online

The True Cost is a groundbreaking documentary film that pulls back the curtain on the untold. Watch the true cost online free. This is a story about clothing. It's about the clothes we wear, the people who make them, and the impact the industry is having on our world. The price of clothing has been decreasing for decades, while the human and environmental costs have grown dramatically. The True Cost is a groundbreaking documentary film that pulls back the curtain on the untold 9movies - watch The True Cost (2015) online free in Full HD 1080p.

The True Cost is a documentary film exploring the impact of fashion on people and the planet.

The True Cost" is a documentary by Andrew Morgan which explores the whole network of clothe's production and consume, unlatching the concept of fast fashion and his implications.

Genre: Documentary, Biography, Drama. Actor: Stella Mccartney, Vandana Shiva, Safia Minney, Tansy Hoskins. Director: andrew morgan. Trailer: The True Cost (2015).

Read the The True Cost full movie script online. SS is dedicated to The Simpsons and host to thousands of free TV show episode scripts and screencaps, cartoon framegrabs and movie scripts. American consumers fully captured fashion H & M, and we already know that Americans They are very price oriented. If you combine these two together, with fashion and price, then you have the recipe. The True Cost is a groundbreaking documentary film that pulls back the curtain on the untold story and asks us to consider, who really pays the price for our clothing?(C) Official Site. Picture from Andrew Morgan.

Watch movies online free stream: The True Cost (2015) The True Cost is a documentary film exploring the impact of fashion on people and the planet. The True Cost (2015).

This is a story about clothing. It's about the clothes we wear, the people who make them, and the impact the industry is having on our world. The price of clothing has been decreasing for decades, while the human and environmental costs have grown dramatically. The True Cost is a groundbreaking documentary film that pulls back the curtain on the untold story and asks us to consider, who really pays the price for our clothing?
Credited cast:
Livia Giuggioli Livia Giuggioli - Herself (as Livia Firth)
Stella McCartney Stella McCartney
Vandana Shiva Vandana Shiva - Herself
Richard Wolff Richard Wolff - Himself
Lucy Siegle Lucy Siegle - Herself
Mowla Chowdhury Mowla Chowdhury - Herself
Shima Akhter Shima Akhter - Herself
Tim Kasser Tim Kasser - Himself
Catherine Charlot Catherine Charlot - Herself
Orsola De Castro Orsola De Castro - Herself
Rick Ridgeway Rick Ridgeway - Himself
Jagdisan Tiruvadi Jagdisan Tiruvadi - Himself
Christina Dean Christina Dean - Herself
Safia Minney Safia Minney
Satish Sinha Satish Sinha - Himself


User reviews

Nalmetus

Nalmetus

"The True Cost" is a professionally-done documentary by Andrew Morgan which covers many of the multiple problems caused by America's current clothing gluttony. Going to thirteen separate countries, the viewers visually get a small taste of some of the devastation caused by "Fast Fashion", whether it is drenching of farmlands with pesticides and the resultant birth defects in India to the following of a Bangladesh single mother and garment worker who knew people in the Rana Plaza building collapse which claimed more than 1100 people. Although the topics are,at times, heavy and thought provoking, the overall tone of the documentary is neither gloomy nor preachy. "The True Cost" is an ambitious project that opens your eyes to many of the ills caused by our current economic policies and our addiction to spending. It is a great springboard for further discussions and movie projects. -Jack A
Ger

Ger

It's really an eye opener to the secrets behind the clothing industry. In fact the western corporates and consumers have blood on their hands by choosing to stay ignorant about the clothing and food industry. It's sickening how these "happy commercials of lush beauty and nice clothes" are use to fool the world and making it worse and worse for out planet and third world people....SEE THIS AND THINK AGAIN!

Never ever will you buy your clothes without thinking about where it's coming from and what role it played in the environment and the workers behind these clothes. I hope people will start opening their eyes with this documentary
Rocksmith

Rocksmith

Prepare to be horrified and shamed at what is required for those of us in the West to wear what we wear. This eye-opening documentary shows every aspect of the fashion industry from the cotton crop to the landfills where all of our style ends up. We need more films like this to educate the public on the consequences of our rapacious consumerist lifestyle in the West.

After seeing the slave factories where much of our clothing is made the words "sweat shop" seem woefully inadequate to describe these horrible fixtures of modern capitalism.

What an absolutely appalling lack of empathy by those in this film defending the deplorable working conditions of many clothing industry workers. I just wish that we could make these creeps work for one month in one of these hell-holes. We literally fought in the streets in the last century to end that kind of exploitation of workers and the apologists in this film want us to simply accept this now as the inexorable march of globalism. The problem is that we will allow this same exploitation again in our own countries soon enough and we'll be right back in the middle ages again before you know it.
Winenama

Winenama

Warning: This Movie Review Contains Spoilers

The True Cost

Directed and Written By: Andrew Morgan

Stars: Stella McCartney, Livia Firth, Vandana Shiva, Safia Minney, Richard Wolff. Orsola De Castro, Rick Ridgeway, Tim Kasser, Tansy Hoskins, John Hilary, Guido Brera

An accurate honest view that is sadly appalling. Did not know the pain and suffering is ongoing and to that extent. The news rarely covers this issue and it appears every now and then as if it is an accident that is unexpected not ignored.

This movie is an eye-opener to a world that's so well hidden through wonderful advertising of glossy magazine and glamorous celebrities. It is so easy to turn a blind eye when it is not affecting us because we do not know we want to feel as if we are living the life regardless of what it does to anyone else.

Had we known it was to that extent and people in the sourcing business and these big brands and advertising agencies truly may not know? This is heavy on the heart because all of what is said in the movie is true. For example, When Livia Firth Eco-fashion activist, stated about us the consumers being taken for a ride with this fast fashion and we spend the money thinking we're rich because we buy a lot but we are becoming poorer. We earn that money to get those things for people we don't like it's funny how silly we take money and clothes for granted.

Seeing these people work under these harsh conditions and being beaten it is slavery because they have no other options and a lawsuit cannot be claimed because it is voluntary and these brands are not directly associated with these horrible factories.

A Fair trade company, 'People Tree' is another alternative solution to purchase affordable, Eco- friendly fashion that had workers work from a proper 9-5 not 7 till God knows when all day everyday for about 2 cents an hour it is ridiculous. We cannot complain these people hustle and stay humble and try to be happy with nothing and some of us say we're depressed and have everything.

This movie could have perhaps added more about brands that are involved in fair trade fashion and these unhealthy factories. Plus, telling us how to get involved in helping people in Bangladesh, Cambodia and China would have been sufficient. I love this movie's message about fashion with a conscious and that we should balance the divide because the people who make these clothes deserve better than this they must lead a life similar to ours; it is unfair.

Justice must happen and a movement must take place more stronger than this so this movie is a beautiful step towards a more enlightened future. This movie shed light on a hidden issue that is brutal behind a beautiful business. A bitter reality of how someone in power can treat people in a vulgar manner. This movie's initiative is incredible. Its brutal honesty about the fashion industry is fully appreciated. Andrew Morgan should make more and more documentaries
Dobpota

Dobpota

This movie is biased. A lot. But that doesn't mean that what it isn't saying is right.

Because it is.

"The True Cost" is a movie about the clothing industry and the costs the fast fashion world we live in today has, with uncontrolled consumerism and a total lack of understanding of the processes behind the clothes we wear.

And the movie does a great job in showing many aspects behind the product you are wearing. It tells the story of many of the workers, and also owners of industries, and brings home many points, from how the workers labor is made cheap, or how they have to work in horrible environments, to the illnesses people get because of the way the industry works or the consequences for the environment.

The movie unashamedly points to out-of-control consumerist capitalist society as the big reason behind what is happening, with people just buying for the sake of it, and society sending constant messages about the need of buying and changing clothes constantly. It is, as said above, a movie that doesn't hide its agenda. But, at the same time, it is absolutely true that the work conditions of the workers of the industry are terrible, that the environment is suffering because of the industry, and that we buy too many things we don't really need.

This is a movie necessary to think a little bit about what's behind the clothing industry, what we don't see/don't want to see, and how we should care about it because we should care about other humans and the world we live in.
Akinozuru

Akinozuru

"The True Cost" is a documentary by Andrew Morgan which explores the whole network of clothe's production and consume, unlatching the concept of fast fashion and his implications. Approaching the social and envirement impacts, the film shows the true cost of the fashion consume in this age, including the physical and psiquic ills caused by the chlote's production in poor countries without labor laws, ground's contamination caused by the agriculture required for the sector's industry and the social problems related to the economic policies and globalized production chain. The great problem of this film is the attempt to investigate all the issues intrinsic of the fashion cost. When treating multiple questions, the documentary ends up becoming a shallow investigation, without deepening and solidity. This desorganization is allied to a lack of interactions with the viewer and boring interviews, besides not including important social actors of the fashion production.
Malalrajas

Malalrajas

The exploitation of wage-slaves in developing countries as a key component of our current economic system is a very important topic, one that I'm deeply interested in, but this film doesn't do the subject matter any justice at all. The collapse of the factory in Bangladesh and the narrative about the mother who tried to unionise but was shut down by the owners, along with a brief but similar story in Cambodia are really the only parts of the film that had anything to do with the premise.

The rest of the film is just a mess. The time wasted on following around a woman who works for a "fair trade" clothing company just comes across as a long-winded advertisement, and conveniently skirts the issue that this woman is still a capitalist who is profiting off the labor of people in other countries. She throws the phrase "fair trade" around a whole lot without ever actually defining what it means in respect to her company's business practices. I guess we're supposed to feel good that the poor people in Bangladesh are being slightly less exploited by her company.

The non-sequitur in the middle of the film about GM crops and "organic" cotton is where I really started to lose respect for this film. The charlatan known as Vandana Shiva makes an appearance, spouting out her typical disinformation about the "evils" of GM technology. This woman is not by any means a scientist, and is not in any way an expert on biotechnology or agriculture. So many of her claims have been debunked a thousand times (namely the claim that GM crops have led to increased suicide rates in India) that it almost defies belief that people still listen to anything she says. All I can really say is look to actual scientific/public health organisations and they all agree that GM crops are perfectly safe. "Organic" food (and especially clothing, what a joke!) has no health benefits over conventional crops and is actually a hugely profitable capitalist enterprise in itself, despite the wholesomely smug, "we're the good guys" image that these companies use to market their overpriced crops to the worried well. Say what you want about Monsanto trying to monopolise on seeds (which isn't true by the way, there are other companies in the GM market), just realize that the patenting and marketing of seeds was around way before GM and exists in the "organic" world as well. This economic angle has nothing to do with the safety of the crops, their environmental impact, or the fact that we almost certainly will need GM crops to feed the world. The ability to design high-yielding crops to adapt to the catastrophic climate change that's on the horizon, or to remedy nutrient deficiencies in the developing world (just read about how Shiva worked tirelessly to sway public opinion against Golden Rice) makes this technology invaluable to the future of our species.
Mananara

Mananara

I gave it a five since it exposes the true ugly and dark underside of the clothing industry. With all but the very high end clothing produced offshore in the West, a massive industry of unregulated, nonunion dangerous sweatshops in the lowest labor cost nations produces most of our clothing. Think of that next time you buy a 100 dollar shirt and see that it was made in Vietnam probably for about $2.00 cost.

However the movie takes a hard left turn in the second half. They have the requisite video segment from a Fox News talking-head about sweatshops and how they might really serve a purpose. Then they interview Marxist economic Richard Wolf who blames the problem on not on idiot consumers or corrupt governments in producer nations, but on capitalism and calls for a new system. What new system? Socialism of course. Every useful idiot academic these days is in love with socialism.

Capitalism is not the problem. It is brain dead materialistic consumers who turned shopping from necessity into a weekly hobby and became addicted to cheap overseas products. Generations X and Y who consume like fools. Look at the ages of those waiting in line on Black Friday and in front of an Apple Store when Tim Cook announces the newest $1200 iPhone. These are all younger Americans charging in to buy the products of sweatshops. Change their minds and you solve a great part of the problem. The other issue not addressed is the fault of the governments of the producer nations. No unions, labor laws, decent wages or environmental controls. The movie implies that these governments has no power against these corporations. Sure they do. This was the situation in the US 100+ years ago and we solved it. But somehow the third world is not at fault. In this film. The Western capitalists are at fault in the logic of the producers and writers. Worth watching with a critical eye.
monotronik

monotronik

Nice expose of the global fashion industry, from a clearly biased and non-objective source. The whole movie is permeated with anti-capitalist rhetoric and indictments of the profit motive, materialism, and American companies. At 1:15 when the "economist" comes on, I knew we were in for a snow-job of epic proportions. He talks down to the audience like he's teaching the theory of socialism to kindergarteners for the first time. The film, ironically also focuses on how the local Indo-Chinese factory unions keep getting crushed. Instead of campaigning for stronger unions and police protection of the union reps, they film backs the message that the solution is to try and guarantee a "living wage" to factory workers. Yeah, that's what the whole union protest was about, a hallmark of capitalism that is being crushed by the local governments.

Thanks, Karl Marx, I just wanted to see a movie about the fashion industry, not a 90 minute propaganda film telling me how evil I am for buying a t-shirt. The authors are using the suffering of those innocent people to advance their distorted perspective, they are no better than the factory owners.
Onaxan

Onaxan

This documentary clear shows the exploitative methods used by Big companies and owners and how the slavery has been outsourced to 3rd world countries. This documentary also invokes the responsibility of an average citizen towards our environment. Being a citizen of a 3rd world country like India, i completely understand the situation of the workers in india and the neighboring countries and how our people are being exploited in every industry.

One thing we need to understand is our role in the society. Everyone's role is being reduced to a role of "consumer". Think about it.

Don't worry about the Metascore and Critics reviews. They don't understand how important this film is.
ZEr0

ZEr0

The True Cost documents filmmaker Andrew Morgan's efforts to understand the world of fast fashion (with it's "fifty two seasons a year" marked by $5 shirts and $20 pairs of jeans), a world that's only existed for a few decades and has had enormous impacts on people's lives in both high- and low-income economies. It's a well-traveled and wide-ranging film, sometimes so much so that you get a bit lost for it's jumping from one place to another. But the economic systems that connect garment workers in countries like Bangladesh and Cambodia to North American, European, and Asian consumers are complicated, often intentionally obscure, and they affect people and ecosystems all over the globe, so the film's wide angle view makes sense. To covers so much means that the film sometimes jumps quickly from topic to topic, without digging very deeply into any one issue for long (towards the end of the film, for example, its critique of consumerist / materialist capitalism follows logically from all we've seen, but the discussion can't do justice to the complexity of the questions posed). But for a documentary meant to introduce the topic, that's a reasonable directorial choice to make. Beautifully filmed, with passionate, informed, and compassionate interviewees, The True Cost is worth watching.
Cia

Cia

True Cost is a honest, interesting and meaningful documentary about industry of clothing today and how simple everyday acts of greed and consumption can have devastating results in the lives of millions around the globe. Although it is not so much provoking, it is filmed by a certain distance but it makes direct comments for all the above subjects. In this film everything seems to be connected, from the fashion icons and clothing industry to the GMO cotton seeds made by one of the biggest profitable companies today and the terrible situations that labor workers face when they ask a raise of salary for their minimum and basic needs.

The end credits was a clever ad which let us watch the director himself shooting with his camera in some of the places he visited for filming this documentary. Also, when a certain song with title "I want it all" starts to play in the scene where we watch people running like maniacs to buy whatever they catch on a Black Friday Day in U.S.A, it is completely in tune with the scene and shocking, it hits us in our gut how can people be so blind and to seek happiness or social success in materialism and consumption of things. Truth to be told, in the century we live in, we are accustomed to be accepted from the society for our looks or our social and economical level. There is a reference in Martin Luther King J. in the film, saying that "What America needs is a revolution of values". But this is more than America, it is global, and documentary has a hopeful message at the end, proposing that this situation might change in some years maybe and people start to think of other people and not of profits and money. As much as I doubt this assumption, it is of high importance that more films being made like this one, from respectable people that care enough to spread the truth all over the world, for people to see and realize what is the true imperative of humanity and human nature.
Agamaginn

Agamaginn

In this examination of the clothing industry, director Andrew Morgan says that he knew nothing about the industry before embarking on making the movie. Maybe he offers that fact in support of initial objectivity to justify presenting an accumulation of damning evidence showing objectionable conduct in all components of the industry.

In 2013 the spotlight was placed on the apparel industry in the aftermath of the of the Rana Plaza building collapse in Bangladesh where over 1000 workers died. The apparel industry was on the hot-seat after Rana Plaza and I wish there would have been discussion in this movie about how the brands using that building reacted to the event.

A case is made that most of the evils of the industry are propagated by the desire to reduce the price point of all products, and this permeates all facets of the industry--all the way from cotton production, pesticide use, improper waste disposal, pollution of soil and rivers, factory conditions bordering on slave labor, and potential health issues.

Cheap labor is seen as the driving force behind the fact that most all apparel manufacturing is now done in poorer countries. In 1950 over 95% of clothing sold in the United States was produced in the United States. Today that figure is 3%.

It's hard to see how to break the vicious cycle of downward pressure on price--if a factory does not knuckle under to price demands, the companies blackmail them by saying that they will just go to a country that can meet their demands. Some of the industry executives in third world countries interviewed here say that having apparel factories in their country is a boon to them in that they offer some employment for people who would otherwise likely have no employment. The downside of capitalism is much on display here.

Some statistics stood out for me: the average western consumer throws away 85 pounds of clothing a year (amounting to 11 million tons a year in the U.S.) and only about 10% of these are recycled. This means that much of this clothing winds up in mountains of waste that take years to biodegrade. And, yes, these mountains of waste mostly wind up in poorer countries. No mention is made of the environmental toll taken to ship clothes, both new and used, all over the world.

Some relief from the downbeat tone is given by giving a nod to the few companies that are trying to buck the trend, like a Texas cotton farm producing organic cotton and some fair trade companies like People Tree. These small efforts offer the only optimism presented in the movie.

Not all change needs to come from the industry, since consumers bear some responsibility. A more judicious approach to buying clothes is called for--the "wear once and toss" use is a part of the problem. Apparel consumption is up over 400% in the last couple of decades. Consumers are urged to cut back on their purchases and to recycle rather than toss. But, as evidence of how complicated it is to improve the situation, a cutback in consumer spending could ultimately make things worse by closing factories, resulting in more unemployed and more downward pressure on price.

As long as consumers seek the lowest prices, and you can't blame them, this situation will continue until movies like this, and other educational efforts, provoke a consumer backlash against the main offenders. Another tipping point toward industry correction, beyond consumer awareness, could come when the collateral environmental damage reaches such crisis proportions that there is a citizen rebellion.

Little mention is made of specific brands and their practices, perhaps for fear of legal actions. I wanted to know specifics. There were a couple of images of Levi's stores, implying guilt by association with the overarching negativity. I noticed that director Morgan was wearing a pair of Levi's. And Levi's was not operating out of Rana Plaza and I think they are more concerned about corporate responsibility than most brands. Knowing which brands are the best and which are the worst would at least provide some guidance for people to gravitate to the better brands. You would think that above all Nike would have been mentioned.

It would be interesting to examine the true cost of almost any industry--the oil and gas industry is an obvious choice. Tracing the true cost of any manufactured good would be enlightening, like what it takes to manufacture a car, what it takes to support that car once it is on the road, and what happens when it has reached the end of its useful life. Or cell phones, or ...

It's hard to leave this movie in a positive frame of mind.
lacki

lacki

Great documentary about the real price we pay (people and the planet) for fashion and overbuying clothing. At times it seemed that it was repeating and dragging, but overall worth the time. I can no longer justify my clothing donations to charity.
Gavinranara

Gavinranara

A primitivist stance in which the losers of their markets (film production, fashion, journalism) gang against what they call "big business". Meaning the workers in poor countries would be far better crouched in the rice paddy under the Sun, than having a wage. Yet somehow, the entitlements on which the Western losers live are NOT to be sent to the poor workers.

This is yet another refined argument for protectionism and closed borders.
Steelrunner

Steelrunner

I have seen many documentaries, but when it comes to human exploitation this is by far the most question arising docu i have ever seen.

what is development? social justice? basic humanity?

when companies in order to reduce their cost prices and increase profits employ destitute people who doesn't have any alternate career other than being a laborer for a meager salary in sweatshops, and supporting their act by claiming that they are providing livelihood to these wretched lives as if they were not living before these companies came. what do you call it if not social exploitation?

The words spoken by the environmental activist are cent percent true. Fertilizers and seed business in an epidemic in INDIA that is not there before the 1950s. They affected the generations of Punjab region both medically and economically.

Many might think this docu to be an anti-capitalistic propaganda. But developing capitalistic economies at the cost of what? companies might not feel empathy with argument, but a consumer should feel it before falling in the craze of "Brands". They have to remember those hands that suffered for producing the clothing that you're buying at "discounted" prices and festive sales.

The least as an audience should you do is give this a higher rating so that the problem is addressed and more people become aware of what "REAL SLAVERY" would look like in the modern world.
GEL

GEL

I've seen people complaining about being a propaganda, anti capitalism documentary. And because of that you rate the documentary low? Shouldnt' you be worried about the main message of the documentary? Rate it low and people won't see this. So we won't change and everything stays the same. You could at least put your ideologies aside and help spread the worth about this problem.
Alister

Alister

Appreciate people are making such documentary which reveals bitter truth of the fashion industry. Bigger brands are increasing profits every year over the blood of cheap labours. Industry needs to revise the process to increase wage, provide medical facility and improved working conditions. Happy to know that some people across the world have realized and actively working to get things better.
Light out of Fildon

Light out of Fildon

This is an interesting documentary on the garment/fashion industry that is destroying the planet and people's lives. The film juxtapositions western consumerism and third world conditions, but not so much to drive the point as a Michael Moore film. It appears instead of buying clothes that will last we buy throw away items. The result is environmentally bad. Interesting to find out is that we also send so much donated items to Haiti, that we have ruined their local garment industry.

The film also looks at farms, seeds, pesticides, and disease in the third world due to the garment industry. It pushes "Fair Trade" on us. Steven Colbert has replaced Noam Chomsky for commentary, for better or worse. The Stella McCartney train interview with shadows hiding an oddly tilted head should have been shot over. During the film a Bangladesh factory worker has supposed to visit London (?) and report back to the village about their customers. I expected that to be the climax of the film with her saying something poignant, but it never happened. Too much Stella McCartney.

This was a three star production on a five star message. Was this a commercial for "Fair Trade?"

Note to self: Jos. A. Banks is cheaper than paper towels.
Vudozilkree

Vudozilkree

This movie shows the direct impact people can have on people and the environment. It is terrifying that we are allowing such decay of the human body and environment at the expense of a t-shirt or pair of pants. The side effects of the factory works from living in the surrounding factory area's was eye-opening. I have heard about it and seen pictures, but knowing that this film was released just two years ago, very recently, is astounding. I think the film does a very good job of exploring the whole chain from top to bottom, from the VP of sustainability at H&M and Patagonia to the factory workers in India. I am amazed at some of the people trying to make a difference, but the need for support on a larger scale is what is needed and it will take time, but this documentary is very inspiring and progressive. A step in the right direction for healthier people and a healthier planet.