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Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu (1967) online

Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu (1967) online
Original Title :
Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu
Genre :
Movie / Action / Adventure / Family / Horror / Sci-Fi
Year :
1967
Directror :
Noriaki Yuasa
Cast :
Kôjirô Hongô,Kichijirô Ueda,Reiko Kasahara
Writer :
Niisan Takahashi
Type :
Movie
Time :
1h 27min
Rating :
4.6/10
Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu (1967) online

Title: Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu (1967). Gamera's back, and just in time to save Japan from Gaos, a mysterious bat-like creature awakened by a volcanic eruption. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher

Actor: Akira Natsuki Kenji Oyama Kichijirô Ueda Koichi Ito Kojiro Hongo Reiko Kasahara Shin Minatsu Taro Marui Yoshiro Kitahara. Director: Noriaki Yuasa. Watch HD Movies Online For Free and Download the latest movies.

Gallery of 7 movie poster and cover images for Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu (1967). Synopsis: Gamera's back, and just in time to save Japan from Gyaos, a mysterious bat-like creature awakened by a volcanic eruption.

Gamera vs. Gyaos (大怪獣空中戦 ガメラ対ギャオス, Daikaijū kūchūsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu) (lit. Giant Monster Midair Battle: Gamera vs. Gyaos) is a 1967 Japanese kaiju film directed by Noriaki Yuasa Contents. Gamera vs. Gyaos was released theatrically in Japan on March 15, 1967. The film was never released theatrically in the United States, and was released directly to television by American International Television in 1967 as Return of the Giant Monsters. Japanese Movie Database. Retrieved 2007-07-17. Mystery Science Theater 3000.

View the official lists that include Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu. Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu (1967). Kaiju films are a guilty pleasure and none are guiltier than Gamera's supersonic scream that acts as a cutting laser. It's pretty awesome, and leads to a lot more monster gore than casual kaiju fans are used to. Unfortunately, while the big fights are big fun, the human stories are pretty dull. Jostling for attention are the prototypical little kid who has all the ideas and who screams the monsters name ad nauseum, and a plot about a land deal and.

Last completed movie pages. Return of the Giant Monsters. Gaos (USA).

com, Subtitles, Horoscopes & Birth Charts. Subtitles on OpenSubtitles. Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu "Birth" chart of the opening night (premiere) March 15, 1967, Japan. Movie: Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu (1967) Actors, director and other movie creators. Reiko Kasahara ( 1945).

Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu. Find the showtimes for Daikaijû kûchûsen: Gamera tai Gyaosu quickly and easily! Why was it so hard to find in the first place? States.

Gamera's back, and just in time to save Japan from Gaos, a mysterious bat-like creature awakened by a volcanic eruption. As in the first Gamera movie, a young boy establishes an emotional link with Gamera, and the two work together, with the help of the world's scientists, to put and end to Gaos' violent rampage.
Credited cast:
Kôjirô Hongô Kôjirô Hongô - Foreman Shiro Tsutsumi
Kichijirô Ueda Kichijirô Ueda - Tatsuemon Kanamura
Reiko Kasahara Reiko Kasahara - Sumiko Kanamura
Naoyuki Abe Naoyuki Abe - Eiichi Kanamura
Tarô Marui Tarô Marui - Mite-no-Tetsu
Yukitarô Hotaru Yukitarô Hotaru - Hachiko
Yoshirô Kitahara Yoshirô Kitahara - Dr. Aoki
Akira Natsuki Akira Natsuki - Self-Defense Force General
Kenji Ôyama Kenji Ôyama - District Police Commissioner
Fujio Murakami Fujio Murakami - Dr. Murakami
Kôichi Itô Kôichi Itô - Road Company Chairman
Teppei Endô Teppei Endô - Road Company Local Affairs Director
Shin Minatsu Shin Minatsu - Okabe the Photographer
Teruo Aragaki Teruo Aragaki - Gamera
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Yukie Kagawa Yukie Kagawa - Road Company Chairman's Secretary (as Hiroko Nishi)

This is the first film in which Gamera bleeds.


User reviews

Damdyagab

Damdyagab

Gaos is my all-time favorite enemy of Gamera. A giant bat from a volcano who can fire lasers from his mouth, this wedge-headed critter can slice through anything but Gamera's carapace. Why do I like Gaos? He's virtually indestructible, mean and he looks great!

Gamera comes spiraling down to earth as a series of devastating volcanic eruptions are occurring. Out in the countryside, near a volcano, a road is being built through a farming village and the farmers are threatening a violent protest. out of the volcano flies Gaos - the biggest, nastiest, laser-firing bat you have ever seen. Almost immediately, Gaos chews up a newspaper reporter (who we didn't like anyway) and abducts a little boy. What is Gamera going to do?

The cinematography and effects are a touch above average for the late 60s, and, as with the classic Destroy All Monsters, the subplots add nicely to the main story. Though this is one of my favorites in the Gamera series, it does drag a bit at times.

Recommended for Kaiju fans. Also recommended for evenings of massive intoxication.
August

August

SPOILER: This silly but enjoyable film begins with an airplane being sliced in half by a ray. Then the ray is revealed belonging to a ray firing, flying, man-eating super vampire monster named Gyaos. But when Gyaos tries to eat a boy named Eiieechi, it's Gamera to the rescue. Gamera saves the boy, but almost gets his hand sliced of by Gyaos's ray. Gamera heals his wounds again and arrives when Gyaos attacks Tokyo. He manages to bite off Gyaos foot but is again hurt in the process. So the foot floats ashore and scares people. Then it is discovered that Gyaos can be hurt by sunlight and will die if exposed to the sun. So they decide to make a spinning fountain of drugged blood and Gyaos will get dissy and drugged and not be able to return to his cave and will die in the sun when it reaches dawn. However, a malfuntion in the mechanism causes the plan to fail. This is a good Gamera adventure with a zany plot and good effects.
Unde

Unde

GAMERA VS. GAOS (1967) **1/2 (D: Noriaki Yuasa) Gaos proves a tough opponent, a Rodan-like bird with a laser breath capable of cutting planes in half (and Gamera's leg!). A fun entry in the series, as Gaos is not easy to overcome and one wonders how Gamera will be able to defeat him.
Balladolbine

Balladolbine

When it came time for him to make "Gamera vs. Gyaos" in 1967, director Noriaki Yuasa's skill with the motion picture camera had vastly improved since his first stab at directing the giant terrapin two years prior. That was one of my chief complaints about the first movie, "Gamera the Giant Monster": I was always aware that it was being directed by a neophyte filmmaker. For the second movie, the marvelously colorful and entertaining "Gamera vs. Barugon," Mr. Yuasa was given command of the special effects crew and this was great practice. Because by film number three, this one, his talents had been buffed up and he was set to make a satiably entertaining low-key monster movie.

In this third entry, a volcanic eruption results in the return of Gamera, who is drawn toward sources of heat and energy, and the awakening of a giant bat-like monster called Gyaos, which begins feeding off the local populations, eventually terrorizing a large city to satiate his hunger. Initially drawn in to defend a young child (Naoyuki Abe), Gamera begins his second war with another giant animal.

"Gamera vs. Gyaos" was given a smaller budget than its immediate predecessor and one can tell examining their qualities. This entry does not have the same brilliant special effects and a fair amount of acting is subpar. But then again, that's also part of the charm. And besides, Mr. Yuasa and screenwriter Nisan Takahashi treat their story with a surprising amount of seriousness. At times, it's downright creepy. Gyaos is one of the more truly evil monsters in the Gamera franchise and it's no surprise that he's been reused in all of the film generations since his debut here. There's a scene where we see him poised over a wrecked train, leering down hungrily upon a crowd of fleeing people, in a shot that is perfectly integrated, and it's rather unnerving.

There were no children shouting "Gamera! Gamera!" in the previous film, but there is one here. However, the young actor, Mr. Abe, has some charisma and he isn't as obnoxious as he potentially could have been. The movie does not focus upon him: he's a supporting character and the dynamic between him and Gamera is not annoying nor insufficient, and it does not create a schizophrenic mishmash when paralleled with the more solemn moments of the movie. The story also has some engaging elements, such as the introductory plot of the road construction officials clashing with stubborn landowners unwilling to give up their leases so than an expressway can be built through their property.

But the stars are the monsters and they are in good form. There are three battles between the two behemoths, each of them satiably lengthy and imaginative. The only big lapses being moments where we get close-ups of Gamera's hands as he claws around for boulders (or young children in peril). Like the previous entry, there is also a fair amount of gore, but Mr. Yuasa's counters by giving Gamera and Gyaos green and purple blood respectively, so that children will not be so affronted. The creatures are also well represented by clever use of low-key special effects and good cinematography, with only one really badly-directed moment where Gyaos is recovering from a battle inside of a cave, at which point the camera angles and contrast between the suit and the miniature set seems rather amateurish.

Although it fails to reach the same height as "Gamera vs. Barugon," the third entry in the original series still manages to hold up well as low-key entertainment. And it is instilled with that wonderful sense of unrestrained imagination that I tend to associate with science-fiction. Even if it is quite silly.
Rindyt

Rindyt

Of the two American releases of this film, the AIP print is far superior to the Sandy Frank chop job.

This is the best of the first Gamera series, and it is out-right fun if taken on its own terms, without high expectations.

Yet exactly for that reason, this film reveals the real problem with the original Gamera films - we all expect sloppy SFX from the old Gamera, but that would be excusable if the writing were any better.

It's in the plotting that this film, like all the old Gamera films, really lets us down. The Gamera production team never did figure out how to develop a plot that wove the monsters and the humans together in any interesting way - or any way at all. The back-story - a small village trying to work out a deal with a highway development company - is related to the Gamera-Gaos conflict by pure coincidence; that the road company supervisor would then become a central player in the Japanese Self-Defense Force effort to combat Gaos is ridiculous.

Besides being annoyingly smug, the leading scientist is equally ridiculous - his plans for trapping Gaos include hiring a small army of chemists to come up with a vat of synthetic human blood as bait - even though Gaos has already demonstrated that he us perfectly happy with horse and cow blood; the Japanese government would rather pay chemists hundreds of thousands when they could hire a few decent butchers on daily wage? The chemists lobby works wonders with the Japanese government.

Actually, once the monsters show up, the plot falls apart completely, and by the end of the film we've lost interest in even the little boy who befriends Gamera.

Oh well; at least it's watchable, and, in a dumb way, even entertaining. But if this is the best the early Gamera had to offer, it's hard to see what made it popular in the first place.

See the first "Gammera the Invincible", then see this film, then skip a couple decades to the trilogy starting with "Gamera, Guardian of the Universe" - you'll be doing yourself a favor.
Blackbeard

Blackbeard

The world of Gamera has seen this flying turtle battling many different types of creatures and Gaos is a very powerful enemy. Gaos flies and has a supersonic beam of sound that can slice any substance in the world. Gaos has one very bad habit, he likes to chew and feed on people. Gaos has one big weakness, he cannot stand being in the light of the sun. Gamera, our hero does his best to keep Gaos in the morning sun but sadly for us, fails. What can stop such a powerful enemy? Has Gamera finally met his match?
Kriau

Kriau

Most of the Gamera series films are not all that good. In fact a few were downright bad. However a few of the Gamera Films were very good, this happens to be one of the very good Gamera Films.

Gamera reappears and heads towards a mountain. A helicopter travels over the same mountain and notices strange lights glowing from within. Then a bright yellow beam emerges slicing the helicopter in half. Later on a young boy is walking down within the mountains and is snatched by a giant winged monster. Gamera appears and saves the boy but has his arm sliced up badly by this other monsters yellow ray. The boy is interviewed and says that the other monster that fought Gamera is called Gaos because that is the sound it made. ???????????? While Gamera is recovering in the ocean people fear that Gaos will attack. However it is soon figured out that Gaos is nocturnal so he will only attack at night time. Gaos attacks the city and fights Gamera again, Gaos seems to have won the fight but shoots his own foot off since Gamera was biting it and the sun was coming out. It is figured out that sunlight causing Gaos to shrink and die. Keeping Gaos out in the sun seems to be the way to defeat him, but it soon seems to appear that only Gamera can stop him.

THis is one of the best Gamera series, up there with Gamera vs Barugon. This is the first time that Gamera is the good guy and he would remain a hero for the rest of this series. I think that Gamera makes a much better heroic monster than Godzilla and it seems to work a lot better but I am not exactly sure why. Maybe because he is a turtle who can fly, like Superman. So basically Gamera being a good guy seems to work out and this is the first film where he is a good guy.

The villain in this film, Gaos, is awesome. Gaos is my favorite monster from the Gamera series. A truly terrifying monster who fits the villain role perfectly. Gaos looks evil, he has sharp teeth, huge wings that make wind storms, shoots gas out of his chest, his eyes glow, shoots a yellow ray that slices up everything, eats people for their blood, makes a terrifying screech, and flies fast over buildings. The part where he eats the guy who thought his hand was a tree scared me so bad when I was a little kid that I had to hide behind a chair. Great villain and the most popular of Gamera's villains. Gaos would return in the film Gamera vs Guiron and also later in the millennium series. Gaos is to the Gamera series what Ghidorah is to the Godzilla series.

The music is great in this film. It goes with the flow of the film great, especially the scenes where Gaos is attacking the city.

This film goes back to the idea of Gamera being the friend of children, something that was not touched upon in Gamera vs Barugon. This is something that you almost never see in Godzilla Films, other than Godzilla's Revenge.

There is a lot of blood spilled in this film. Gamera gets his arm sliced up bad, Gaos loses a foot, and other brutal stuff happens. Gamera films never have a lack of blood being spilled and this is another major difference between the Gamera Series and the Godzilla Series. At times they go overboard on the blood and it does get disgusting and ridiculous at times. I guess they just want to show how gruesome fights can be. Defitely all the blood spilling and violence makes some parts in Gamera films non forgettable.

The monster fights are really good. For the first time and maybe only time, the final battle in a Gamera Film is not one sided. The final fight is actually pretty close and the argument can be made that Gaos is Gamera's toughest foe.

This is one of the two best Gamera Films. Worth watching, go see it. It is a movie that I will always remember.
great ant

great ant

The dubbing for this one is pretty decent, but for some reason everyone pronounces Gamera like Gomorrah. Anyways, it's 1967 and this year "Son of Godzilla" and "Gamera vs. Gyaos" go head to head. Like "Gamera vs. Barugon", the story's focus is on everyday characters in the wake of a crisis. A child does get involved, but not in the overly-campy-pain-in-the-ass way, unlike the next one "Gamera vs. Viras". Now "Son of Godzilla" isn't all bad and I actually enjoy that G-film, but it is one of the more child-friendly ones. This Gamera movie however is for the most part darker than most 60s or 70s Gamera. It's this one where Gamera really becomes the "friend to all children", but he has an awesome opponent: Gyaos. Probably inspired by Rodan, but with a different, sleeker design. Gyaos is a classic kaiju, the only one to reappear in more recent films the 90s and even in the latest movie, "Gamera the Brave".

Gyaos spends a lot of the movie eating innocent people, regenerating lost body parts and blowing up cities, awesome. There's even a scene where he drinks blood. The battles are bloody and quite fun, and the score is nicely done. This is definitely one of the better vintage kaiju movies and one I recommend to fans of classic sci-fi cinema.
Daron

Daron

This third offering in the "Gamera, the Giant Flying Turtle" franchise is one of the better ones. However, by this point the filmmakers started imitating the tone of recent Godzilla films to make the series more kid-friendly, so from here Gamera starts becoming a nice monster who watches out for the welfare of children. There would usually be a little boy or two in the lead parts from now on, but GAMERA VS. GYAOS still emerges as an enjoyable outing, retaining some strong moments for a movie geared to a juvenile audience. Much of that is owed to the truly mean and overpowering nature of Gyaos himself: he's a giant bat who shoots laser beams from his jaws which can cut objects clear in half! Superhero Gamera truly appears to have met his match this time and it seems nearly impossible for him to overcome the threat of his formidable opponent. **1/2 out of ****
Heraly

Heraly

I really wish people would stop comparing Gamera & Gojira.I would like to see a movie with Gamera,Giant Robot,The original Ultraman & Gojira team up as the Kaiju version of the fantastic 4.All of these took some serious hits to save mankind from danger.A true Kaiju fan would not put down all films.In this film Gamera gave fans what happens when Monsters really go at it.They were literally trying to kill each other.I thought this was an awesome film.The special effects in this film were very good.The details in this film were good even in the scene where the reporters were trying to get Gyao's picture and he cut the car in half with his sonic beam.The mid air battle over the baseball stadium.Those earthquakes at the beginning of the film.Let's face it for a film made in the 60's this was probably the best Kaiju films in that era.
Envias

Envias

This is the third installment of Showa Gamera series. It features in my opinion the best looking rival of Gamera - namely Gyaos. In this movie, Gamera as friend of little kids also gets firmly established.

An ancient monster Gyaos awakes due to activity of Mt. Fuji. Gamera was sleeping near by and awakened by Gyaos' movement. In an effort to save a boy, Gamera challenges Gyaos. Gyaos can fire ultrasound from its mouth that slices through almost anything. Being cut by Gyaos' ultrasound, Gamera retreats to the ocean. Gyaos is carnivorous, and nocturnal. It flies out at night to eat humans. How will Gamera defeat Gyaos without being sliced by Gyaos' ultrasonic attack ?

Problem that existed in the previous Gamera movie is still present in this movie - namely poor integration of human related scenes with that of the monsters. Compared to Toho's Godzilla movies that teamwork between directors Ishiro Honda, and Eiji Tsuburaya was seamless, this movie suffers poor matching of human related part of the story with the part kaijyu appears.

Kojiro Hongo who've appeared in 1995 version of Gamera vs. Gyaos (Gamera Guardian of the Universe) is the star of this move.

This is probably the only Japanese movie that shows kaijyu eating humans.

If the story line involving humans were as good as the scenes containing the monsters, this movie would have been 10x better (which they did right with Gamera Guardan of the Universe). But out of all Showa Gamera series, this one is the most memorable because of the great antagonist kaijyu that appeared in this movie.
Wiliniett

Wiliniett

Vicious giant bat Gyaos gets awakened by a volcanic eruption and goes on the rampage. It's up to huge prehistoric turtle Gamera to stop him. Director Noriaki Yuasa, working from a lively and engrossing script by Nisan Takahashi, relates the entertaining story at a steady pace and maintains an admirably serious and pretty gritty tone throughout (Gyaos eats a jerky reporter and a little boy finds himself in considerable jeopardy). The solid acting from an able cast rates as another major plus, with especially commendable work by Kojiro Hongo as dedicated construction crew foreman Shiro Tsutsumi, Reiko Kasahara as the feisty Sumiko, and Yoshiro Kitahara as wise zoologist Dr. Aoki. Naoyuki Abe as token little boy Eiichi proves to be surprisingly tolerable and resourceful (he devises the plan for ultimately destroying Gyaos by luring Gamera with a forest fire) and doesn't detract too much from the central narrative. The monster fight scenes are every bit as brutal, drawn-out, and (unexpectedly) gory as they ought to be, with a generous sprinkling of goopy grue as both behemoth beasts tear shreds out of each others' hides and spurt blood all over the place. Granted, the special effects ain't so hot, although the Tonka Toy miniatures and less-than-convincing guys in obvious rubber suit monsters still possess a certain endearingly rinky-dink charm. Nice catchy ending credits theme song, too. Both Akira Uehara's crisp widescreen cinematography and Tadashi Yamaouchi's robust score further enhance the overall sound quality of this hugely fun creature feature.
Vudogal

Vudogal

You have to watch this!!!! Amazing! It's the only episode of Gamera tat I've seen, but it's incredible! Watch it!
Thoginn

Thoginn

Gamera vs. Gyaos (1967)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

Gyaos, a huge bat, flies out of an erupting volcano to wreak havoc on Japan but thankfully that turtle Gamera is available for battle. Yes the special effects are bad, the dubbing worse and the storyline appears to have been written by a three-year-old but the movie still kept me entertained. One reason for this is that there's very little time in the movie where one of the monsters aren't on screen. Yes, both monsters look incredibly fake but that just add some charm to the movie. This Gyaos character is clearly just a wannabe Rodan and you can tell that by his design. The biggest difference in this character is that he can't stay in the sunlight, like a vampire bat, and he can't turn his head. He's also able to shoot lasers from his mouth, which leads to some interesting scenes including one sequence where he cuts a few planes in half. He's also able to cut up Gamera pretty good during their several fights. The big showdown at the end is well worth waiting for and contains plenty of action and laughs. The version I watched was the AIP one, which was released on DVD by Retromedia. The American dubbing is pretty bad and at times gathers many laughs but that's to be expected.
Mavivasa

Mavivasa

Recently picked up the Retromedia DVD double feature of RETURN OF THE GIANT MONSTERS/THE MAGIC SERPENT, the third Gamera volume from this company. As with the previous two DVDs, the transfers looked pretty decent, and for what you get the price is nice. However, like the two previous Retromedia Gamera releases, this one has the same playback problems that plagued the earlier DVDs--one of the features wants to freeze up while it plays. In this instance, the second feature (THE MAGIC SERPENT) freezes up about 10-15 minutes into the film. I have seen various reviews complain about this kind of problem on all 3 of Retromedia's Gamera titles (yet none of their other releases seem to suffer from this). After the problem was brought to their attention with their first Gamera release (DESTROY ALL PLANETS/ATTACK OF THE MONSTERS), it would seem something could be done to correct/prevent any further such occurrence.
TheJonnyTest

TheJonnyTest

A fire breathing, man eating, laser beam shooting, anvil-headed bat named Gyaos is determined to destroy Japan. But alas, the hero creature Gamera comes to the rescue. Good special effects in a silly, but very watchable Sci-fi flick. Cast includes: Kojiro Hongo and Reiko Kasahara.
Survivors

Survivors

What more can be said? This film isn't some kind of masterpiece, but its not horrible. It's meant to be another installation to the Gamera franchise, and that's what it is. I do think Gaos's design and powers are pretty neat. He can fire a beam from his mouth that appears to cut things down to the cellular level. He can regenerate lost limbs as well, which I don't see often in most Japanese Kaiju films. Only thing I didn't care much for though, is that up until the 3/4 mark of the film, it really seems to beat around the bush. Gaos appears, eats a few people, disappears, and repeats day after day, or at least time by time. It seems to be a bit repetitive. Other than that, its fairly watchable but not as much so as some others are.
Tiainar

Tiainar

As far as the first round of Gamera films go, this one is OK. While the omnipresent kid has been added to the formula, the memorably chipper Gamera theme music (a kaiju-sized earworm) has yet to be heard. Briefly, construction and/or volcanos awaken Gyaos, a giant, bird-like monster that can emit a deadly sonic ray. A reporter, guided by a local boy Eiichi (Naoyuki Abe), investigates a mysterious glowing cave near the volcano, where they encounter the creature who promptly consumes the hapless reporter and captures the boy. Fortunately Gamera, who is fond of human children, shows up, and although badly wounded by Gyaos' sonic ray, rescues Eiichi before retiring to the sea floor to recuperate. Having shrugged off the JDF's ineffectual attacks, Gyaos descends on Nagoya, destroying buildings and eating people. Gamera reappears and attempts to hold the evil monster until the sun, the light from which is deadly to Gyaos, rises. Desperate to escape, Gyaos burns off its own foot and flies back to its cave, setting the stage for the final conflict. Despite the technicolour kaiju-gore (of which there is plenty), the movie is aimed at kids. Eiichi is a central character and gets to name Gyaos, ride on Gamera's back, propose defensive strategies, and generally show up in most non-Kaiju scenes. There are also a couple bumbling road-way workers for comic relief. The special effects are a mixed bag, some of the miniatures, such as the road construction set, are very good but the scenes in which monsters and humans interact (e.g. Eiichi riding on Gamera) are less successful. The Gyaos suit is not bad (I liked the pteranodon-like way the wings were articulated at the wrist) and the scenes in the glowing cave when the creature is regenerating its severed foot are quite effective. The titular kaiju melees are reasonably well done, especially the pyrotechnic work. On the down side, a static model seems to have been used for most of the airborne scenes, so Gyaos often flies more like a plane than an animal. All in all, Gamera is Gamera, and if you can't accept a giant, rocket-powered, flying turtle, then this is not the movie for you. If you can, then enjoy, as this is about as good as the first series gets. Watched with English dubbing.
Xar

Xar

This is a great movie. It is the third Gamera movie. The first two Gamera movies are good movies. This is better. The fourth Gamera movie Gamera vs Viras is better. The fifth Gamera movie Gamera vs Guiron is better. The sixth Gamera movie Gamera vs Monster X is better. The seventh Gamera movie Gamera vs Zigra is also better. The eighth Gamera movie Gamera Super monster is also better. The reboot Gamera guardian of the universe is also better. The sequel to the reboot Gamera 2 Attack of legion is also better. The third part to the Gamera reboot series Gamera 3 the revenge of Iris is also better. This movie has a great story line. It also has great acting. It is very scary. 4.5 is good ratting. But this is such a great movie that 4.5 is underrating it. This is an 8. See it.
DireRaven

DireRaven

Gamera vs Gyaos its a very decent sequel to the Gamera series, it established everything that Gamera its known for like saving kids and having crazy monsters.

The plot with the villagers may be boring to some but it kept me entertained just enough to care, the characters are very basic, there isn't much new from the people in the movie.

The monster scenes are really what the movie its all about, and it delivers, the monster Gyaos its a very memorable monster that kept me amused for most of the film.

The fights with Gamera are more this time, this movie has more Gamera in it than Gamera vs Barugon, if you are looking for a cheesy monster movie check it out.
Cyregaehus

Cyregaehus

I also enjoyed Barugon a good deal, but I give the edge to this one mainly because it features the coolest of the Gamera monsters from that era, Gaos. I am apparently not the only one who thought he was rather awesome as he is the only monster from the Showa era to be featured in the Gamera films of the 90's as he was in all three of the films and played a very prominent role. Sure, we do go back to having a kid in a predominant role and we have a couple of horribly dubbed comic relief guys; however, the fights between Gaos and Gamera are some of the best fights of the original films and I just liked seeing Gaos do his things and all the plans that the people tried to come up with to stop the supersonic flying bat bird thing. I saw this film featuring on the cult riffing show Mystery Science Theater 3000 and it made for a very enjoyable episode of the show. I saw a portion of the film without them some years earlier, but I only caught the portion of the film featuring the plan to use a rotating hotel or restaurant to make Gaos dizzy. This film seemed to have more monster action than did Barugon, but Barugon may have had more, it is always hard to tell what MST3K edits out some times.

The story has a group of people wanting to work on a road, but the local villagers are giving them a hard time. However, it is not too long that a strange monster appears and begins to terrorize the area. Gamera too, shows up and rescues a small child before retreating to the sea to nurse wounds he received at the hands of this formidable new monster the kid dubs Gaos because that is what he says the creature sounds like when he screams! Soon the people try to come up with a plan to defeat this monster who sends out a beam of pure sound that cuts through objects as effectively as a laser! Gamera will also try to help fight this foe and he takes a lot of hits in this one! The people will soon learn a weakness and the road subplot will continue to pop up here and there to pad the film!

This film made for a good episode due to the fact there is so many strange things going on. The monster fights are pretty cool, but there is monster blood aplenty flowing everywhere, a fountain of blood and that subplot about the road that will not go away! The boy is not quite as annoying as Kenny, but it is rather strange how he can just pop into classified meetings. One thing they never touch on, Gamera is always said to gain power by consuming fire, but whenever he is injured in this film, Guiron and Zigra he retreats to the water when he is hurt. Seems a bit counterproductive to me.

So, this film has some good points to it and I do enjoy it for the most part, but I will never enjoy Gamera as much as Godzilla. Godzilla just looks more cool and his atomic breath more awesome. People always say that the Gamera films of the 90's are better than the Hensei era Godzilla films made around the same time, but I prefer the Godzilla films. Sure, the effects look a bit better, but I thought the story was better in the Godzilla films and I thought the third and final part of the Gamera films was kind of a weak finish. This one featured a cool enemy who would be the only monster besides Gamera to return for the 90's films. It is enjoyable enough without the MST treatment, they just make it more enjoyable!
Leniga

Leniga

This is the second best Gamera movie from the Showa series; however, that is not saying much. Most of the movies in the first series features annoying kids as the lead characters and basic, recycled space alien-themed plots. This one features Gamera's first and most popular foe, Gyaos, a bat-like creature awakened by a volcanic eruption and goes on an all-out assault on Japan's countryside. A young boy establishes an emotional link to Gamera and befriends him, encouraging him to fight off Gyaos but also trying to convince the military not to destroy Gamera.

The kid is borderline annoying in the movie, but not as maddening as the others later on in the series. The special effects were OK for the most part back during that time; the Gamera suit looks average, but the Gyaos suit looked like it was made out of cardboard. The plot about the scientists trying to decipher methods to destroy Gyaos, while a conflict between a small village trying to work out a deal with a highway development company, is somehow interwoven with the monster story. It's not terribly exciting or intriguing, but it leaves you at least partially entertained throughout the entire movie.

Again, this is the second best Gamera movie of the first series (the best is Gamera vs. Barugon - you get to see some decent monster action and battles and the plot is actually serious and not childish). But, second best means this movie is tolerable and serviceable. Watch the remaining four sequels at your own risk. If not, skip over to the three Heisei Gamera movies of the 1990s and the one Millennium movie of 2006 - you'll find better monster mayhem and better stories there.

Grade C
Perilanim

Perilanim

Third Gamera film finds him continuing as Earth's defender as a volcanic eruption in a small Japanese mountain community being mined unleashes a destructive bat-like monster called Gyaos that thrives on blood, and proceeds to decimate the community, then attack Japan. Only Gamera can defeat it, along with another young boy it has befriended. Marginal entry just misses, though the new monster is a memorable creation, with its flat head, piercing cry, and ruthless nature, the story is contrived and paper-thin, and could have had more impact and style like its predecessors, though is a classic compared to what would follow...
Wire

Wire

I feel bad for not giving this a higher score. Most people don't find it as bad as you would think. What I really hated about this was how this is when the Gamera series starts becoming formulaic. I haven't seen many of the old Godzilla movies, so they might be just as bad. It's just very hard to take this movie seriously with how cheap the special effects are. Gaos' teeth look really bad in particular. This movie features a new monster coming to terrorize Japan. The humans try to stop the monster at first but are defeated and need help from Gamera to stop the monster. Wait, isn't this the exact same thing as the last movie? Yeah, as early in the series as this was, they are starting to run out of ideas. The kid character here is pretty annoying too. He's mostly pointless. He's nothing that Kenny wasn't in the original Gamera movie. That film's really starting to look good now. I hear these movies actually get way better later on. Until then, this old ones are anything but classics. *1/2